in LPRC Reports

Shoplifting Study from Retailer Apprehension Reports Hayes 2003

Shoplifting Study from Retailer Apprehension Reports
Read Hayes, PhD, CPP
2003
Introduction
Shoplifting probably began as soon as the first shop was opened in ancient times. The amount of shoplifting that occurs has increased in the last century as modern retail stores evolved and placed merchandise in open shelves for easy customer access and lower staffing costs (Brodt 1994; Farrell and Ferrara 1985; Hayes 1993; Klemke1992; Sennewald and Christman, 1992; Segrave, 2001). Customer theft is particularly costly. There may be as many as 700 million incidents of shoplifting each year with an estimated loss per incident between $57 and $102 (Cox, et al., 1990; Hayes1991; Klemke, 1992). Total losses from retail theft are estimated to cost retailers about 2 to 3 percent of their gross annual sales or between $12 Billion and $40 Billion each year (Bamfield and Hollinger, 1996; Bureau of National Affairs 1992; Cox et al. 1990; Farrell and Ferrara 1985; Hayes 1993; Hollinger, 2002). Shoplifting accounts for about one-quarter of the theft from retail stores (Hayes 1993; Klemke 1992; Maclean Hunter, 1997). It is evident that shoplifting is a profound problem for retailers.